Welcome back!  Sorry for the lack of posts recently, I’ve been playing a ton of Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 lately and have had a tough time tearing myself away long enough to write anything worth reading.  On that note, I have noticed some striking similarities between 40k and Call of Duty that I may have to devote a separate article to. If, you know, I can stop playing long enough to write it.

In the meantime, the Da Boyz GT has come and gone.  This year, the Da Boyz GT featured no comp scoring.  That’s unusual for the event, which is notorious for its comp scores.  I believe going to no-comp was the right call, given the relative infancy of 6th edition.  The TOs were proven correct when despite the lack of comp scores, a wide variety of lists showed up on the top tables.  The top 10 overall finishers included: GK/IG, Daemons, Eldar/Tau, Chaos Space Marines, Eldar, IG, Tyranids, and Necrons.  When the dust settled, Andrew Gonyo had pulled down yet another 6th edition GT win with a Grey Knight/IG army.  Today we’ve got the army lists of the Da Boyz GT 2012 Best Overall winner Andrew Gonyo and 2nd Overall / Best General Ben Mohile for your viewing pleasure.  Enjoy!

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For this episode of “Trials by Fire” we bring you a RTT game, presented not to illustrate any particular amazing strategy or brilliant play, but to illustrate the value of “selective rules lawyering”, particularly when sportsmanship scores are involved.  Even rules lawyers don’t need to quibble over every little thing.  Let’s face it – people don’t like getting rules lawyered (ha! we’re a verb now!).  Sometimes strict adherence to the rules, even when done calmly and politely, can get your sports scores tanked out of spite.  It can be even worse when you are new to an area or simply traveling into town for a tourney and your opponent, a local, has a lot of buddies to complain to.  Keep in mind (especially in the early rounds) that his buddies may include your future opponents, your judges, and even the TO’s, some of whom may hold the fate of your sports/comp scores in their hands.  This game is a good example that carefully choosing when to object or get a judge/TO involved (when it really makes a difference) and when to let things slide (when it probably doesn’t matter) can be the key to winning the game and maintaining a good sportsmanship rating.
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