SantaMarineThis week’s episode of Reply Briefs is an interesting holiday-related query that’s along the same lines as a question a lot of players have been asking us recently – what 40k army should I buy for 6th edition? We sort of answered the question in this article on netlisting but that was admittedly nonspecific advice.  Now, I still stand by the answer.  I still believe proxying new units and new armies until you find what works best for you is the best way to pick an army that you can be successful with in 6th edition. But this time we’re going to break it down a little more pragmatically. Some credit for this article goes to Szafraniec, as some of it is based on discussions we’ve had recently on similar issues.

The Question: What 40k army should I buy with my Christmas money to stay competitive in 6th Edition?

The Answer: Grey Knights, Necrons, Imperial Guard, or some combination thereof.

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Following GK’s lead, I figured I would fill everyone in. But first, to answer the question, where’s the 40k stuff?

Here is my problem: I CAN’T PICK AN ARMY!

Ever since 6th edition hit, I have been proxying, substituting, listbuilding, mathhammering, and lore-mastering more armies than I care to admit. I will go into this soon, and explain what I see as the “paralysis factor” that the possibility of allies can cause for list-builders. But that’s not this!  So read on to see what I’m up to this week.

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As we’ve gone through the lists that have seen success so far in 6th edition tournaments, and the lists we’re having the most success with in playtesting, we’re noticing a definite increase in the amount of infantry on foot – both the MEQ and horde varieties. Last edition, just about every enemy unit started the game in a tin can of some sort – a rhino, a razorback, a chimera, etc. The changes to scoring and transports in 6th haven’t made transports useless, but they’re no longer an auto-include in most lists, so we’re seeing a rise in boots on the board. This list is prepared to handle those onrushing hordes of infantry models on foot by putting out a significant amount of anti-infantry firepower while retaining mobility thanks to deep-striking GKs and airborne necrons.

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So NOVA 2012 was an amazing success and drew hundreds of players across several very well-received events.  It was so well received, apparently, that despite the fact that it has been over for a couple of months now, we’re still getting a bunch of requests by email (and PMs on dakka) to post more NOVA lists and our impressions.  Well, we’re your rules lawyers, and we’re here to deliver what you want.  So today we’ve got three more nova lists for your viewing pleasure.  We’ll call this set “liststyles of the rich and e-famous”.  Today we’re bringing you the NOVA Open 2012 lists of well-known 40k bloggers Stelek (from Yes The Truth Hurts), Danny Internets (from Bald and Screaming), and Chumbalaya (from Blackjack and Hookers).  Enjoy!

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I love Hordes. And no, I am not talking about WarmaHordes. One obsession at a time.

Since I started 40k I have been drawn to foot lists. Gaunts, Orks, Guardsmen, etc. Something about legions of troops wading into fire, and coming out on top. What this means is that 6th edition is my favorite in a long while. Strong, durable scoring units rule the day, and vehicles got weaker. Sure, they are shootier, and have a place in lists. But it is easier for me to make a list without GK telling me “Mech that shit up”. What hordes have traditionally lacked, however, is mobility. Guardsman blobs count on that ‘move move move’ to help get them to center. Taking a rhino for a tac squad is still a good deal, even better when you add spikes and a havoc launcher.

Still, a well-built horde army has its place in competitive 40k thanks to 6th edition. Ork mobs are one of my favorites, and the faceless legion of Necrons has always had a place in my heart. While it is no secret that Necrons are a strong Codex and often a great place to start, lets ally in a mob or two of these green fellas, and see where we get.

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For a while now I’ve been hesitating to do a “Law Reviews” article on BeakyCon because there’s been a lot of internet drama surrounding the event.  I’m certainly not interested in turning The Rules Lawyers into a 40k drama blog, I’ll leave that to people like Stelek and TastyTaste who do the job with aplomb (and because tone is hard to gauge on the internet, this is meant as a sincere compliment to the aforementioned bloggers).  But BeakyCon is a growing tournament featuring a number of competitive players from around the country and competitive armies, so hopefully our readers can benefit from a bit of commentary and analysis on the winning lists.  Today for your viewing pleasure we’ve got the army lists of BeakyCon GT winner Teddy Woody and runner-up Alex Simon.

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This list is designed around the concept of a nearly unkillable blob holding midfield against all comers.  The core of the list is a massive blob of guardsmen using Azrael to grant the entire blob a 4-up invulnerable save, along with two primaris psykers to try and score Endurance from the Biomancy table.  There simply aren’t many lists that can deal effectively with 50 guardsmen with 4++ invul. saves and feel no pain locking down midfield.

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Since we love arguing about rules, we figured we might as well try our hand at making up some of our own.  As a long-time Magic: The Gathering fan, this article struck a chord with me.  Many codexes, especially some of the older ones, truly have a limited number of ”useful” units.  In an attempt to remedy that, we have borrowed from MTG’s system of allowing players to use multiple “colors” of magic in their decks, and created a format that allows for a greater flexibility in 40k list construction by allowing players to select a small number of units (up to 2) from other codexes.  We hope that running this variant tournament format will give players more freedom in their listbuilding, encourage new strategies and unit combinations, and help breathe new life into older codexes by allowing players to incorporate units from more current armies.

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